Holy Thursday Readings

Let us reflect this Holy Thursday on Sacred Scripture and the Evening of the Lord’s Supper.

Reading 1    EX 12:1-8, 11-14

The LORD said to Moses and Aaron in the land of Egypt,
“This month shall stand at the head of your calendar;
you shall reckon it the first month of the year.
Tell the whole community of Israel:
On the tenth of this month every one of your families
must procure for itself a lamb, one apiece for each household.
If a family is too small for a whole lamb,
it shall join the nearest household in procuring one
and shall share in the lamb
in proportion to the number of persons who partake of it.
The lamb must be a year-old male and without blemish.
You may take it from either the sheep or the goats.
You shall keep it until the fourteenth day of this month,
and then, with the whole assembly of Israel present,
it shall be slaughtered during the evening twilight.
They shall take some of its blood
and apply it to the two doorposts and the lintel
of every house in which they partake of the lamb.
That same night they shall eat its roasted flesh
with unleavened bread and bitter herbs.“This is how you are to eat it:
with your loins girt, sandals on your feet and your staff in hand,
you shall eat like those who are in flight.
It is the Passover of the LORD.
For on this same night I will go through Egypt,
striking down every firstborn of the land, both man and beast,
and executing judgment on all the gods of Egypt—I, the LORD!
But the blood will mark the houses where you are.
Seeing the blood, I will pass over you;
thus, when I strike the land of Egypt,
no destructive blow will come upon you.

“This day shall be a memorial feast for you,
which all your generations shall celebrate
with pilgrimage to the LORD, as a perpetual institution.”

Responsorial Psalm    PS 116:12-13, 15-16BC, 17-18

R. (cf. 1 Cor 10:16) Our blessing-cup is a communion with the Blood of Christ.
How shall I make a return to the LORD
for all the good he has done for me?
The cup of salvation I will take up,
and I will call upon the name of the LORD.
R. Our blessing-cup is a communion with the Blood of Christ.
Precious in the eyes of the LORD
is the death of his faithful ones.
I am your servant, the son of your handmaid;
you have loosed my bonds.
R. Our blessing-cup is a communion with the Blood of Christ.
To you will I offer sacrifice of thanksgiving,
and I will call upon the name of the LORD.
My vows to the LORD I will pay
in the presence of all his people.
R. Our blessing-cup is a communion with the Blood of Christ.

Reading 2    1 COR 11:23-26

Brothers and sisters:
I received from the Lord what I also handed on to you,
that the Lord Jesus, on the night he was handed over,
took bread, and, after he had given thanks,
broke it and said, “This is my body that is for you.
Do this in remembrance of me.”
In the same way also the cup, after supper, saying,
“This cup is the new covenant in my blood.
Do this, as often as you drink it, in remembrance of me.”
For as often as you eat this bread and drink the cup,
you proclaim the death of the Lord until he comes.

Gospel    JN 13:1-15

Before the feast of Passover, Jesus knew that his hour had come
to pass from this world to the Father.
He loved his own in the world and he loved them to the end.
The devil had already induced Judas, son of Simon the Iscariot, to hand him over.
So, during supper,
fully aware that the Father had put everything into his power
and that he had come from God and was returning to God,
he rose from supper and took off his outer garments.
He took a towel and tied it around his waist.
Then he poured water into a basin
and began to wash the disciples’ feet
and dry them with the towel around his waist.
He came to Simon Peter, who said to him,
“Master, are you going to wash my feet?”
Jesus answered and said to him,
“What I am doing, you do not understand now,
but you will understand later.”
Peter said to him, “You will never wash my feet.”
Jesus answered him,
“Unless I wash you, you will have no inheritance with me.”
Simon Peter said to him,
“Master, then not only my feet, but my hands and head as well.”
Jesus said to him,
“Whoever has bathed has no need except to have his feet washed,
for he is clean all over;
so you are clean, but not all.”
For he knew who would betray him;
for this reason, he said, “Not all of you are clean.”So when he had washed their feet
and put his garments back on and reclined at table again,
he said to them, “Do you realize what I have done for you?
You call me ‘teacher’ and ‘master,’ and rightly so, for indeed I am.
If I, therefore, the master and teacher, have washed your feet,
you ought to wash one another’s feet.
I have given you a model to follow,
so that as I have done for you, you should also do.”

Please remember to keep in your prayers the Christians that were killed in Egypt on Palm Sunday and all persecuted Christians throughout the world.

Episode 1

We did it!  Episode 1 aired today at 3:15PM on Divine Mercy Radio!  Here’s a recap of the show:

Blair Seelinger, Matthew Pope, Gloria DeMoura, Matthew Handley, Miriam Bethencourt, and Drew Nichols discussed the importance of faith in trust in God.  This came to us via a question from Charles.  Thanks for the question!  If you have a question you’d like us to answer, email it to info@epicdmr.org , send us a Facebook message, or visit our Contact Us page.

If you missed the show, you can listen on our YouTube channel and Soundcloud.  We’ll have the iTunes podcast set up soon!

Elton John and Tim Rice’s Aida

2017 Aida Poster (smaller)Lights up on a modern history museum, in an exhibit about ancient Egypt.  Suddenly the scene changes and a statue steps out of her case and begins to share the story of the great and devout Egypt conquering Nubia and capturing its slaves.  This is the opening scene to the St. Thomas More Academy Theater Department’s production of Elton John and Tim Rice’s Aida.

One of these Nubian slaves, Aida (Paulette Perez), revolts against her captor and receives the attention of Radames (Aldani Herrera).  Amneris (Anna DeCarlucci), Pharaoh’s daughter has been betrothed to Radames, but after his attention to Aida, a love triangle begins.   Aida turns out to be a Nubian princess is torn between saving her people and being in love with Radames.

A lot of other familiar faces from STMA Theater have returned to the stage for this show.  Michael Sulzen (Benny, In the Heights) plays Zoser, Dallas Eason (Mr. Rosario, In the Heights and Garry, Noises Off!) is Pharaoh, and Kateri Manville (Nina, In the Heights and Dotty, Noises Off!) is Nehebka.

By far, the best number of the show is in the first act.  DeCarlucci belts out Strongest Suit, with her Handmaiden backup singers in this very soulful song.  Midway through this song, and onstage behind a curtain, DeCarlucci pulls off one of the fastest costume changes that STMA Theater has ever done.  As if that was not complicated enough, all of her Handmaidens go through a similar costume changes.

All these brilliant costumes are made by Liliane Watkins and Paola Tavernier (Mrs. Perez), and they have done it yet again with some of the best, most authentic, vibrant costumes for the Theater Department.  The show has many offstage quick changes, and the actors pull this off without flaw.

The set for Aida is a little minimalist for STMA Theater, but the singing and costumes make up for it.  It pales in comparison to last year’s In the Heights and Tarzan, the year before that.

Elton John’s musicals have always had pop flare to them, and Aida is no exception.  Jeffery Rice has put together the Pit Orchestra again featuring a number of the same musicians from last year’s hit, In the Heights.  David Aduddell returns to play bass, Lori Anderson on keyboard, Marc Davis on guitar, and Vince Moss on drums; and they have brought Eton John’s music out to the fullest extent.

I also want to take the time to give a shout-out to Kaleigh Benesch, Maria Mutka, and Thérèse Watkins.  These three managed everything from publicity, to house crew, to selling tickets, to the program, all of which have been completed flawlessly.

The show is funny, meaningful, and most of all entertaining.  From pop to reggae to soul to rock, this Elton John and Tim Rice musical is surely not going to disappoint.  Performances are March 30th-April 1st and April 6th-8th, all at 7PM at the Lower Theater at St. Thomas More Academy in Raleigh.  Tickets are $6 for Students and $8 for Adults.  You can reserve your tickets by calling (919) 878-7640 or by visiting the Theater Department website, stmacademytheater.wix.com/info.

Stations of the Cross

Most parishes throughout the country offer Stations of the Cross on Fridays during Lent.  While most use the traditional Way of the Cross, my parish here in Raleigh began mixing it up by using St. John Paul II’s version, from 1991.

JPII prayed Via Crucis on Good Friday, 1991, in the Vatican.  It has been transcribed, and published in various forms, and we’ve brought it to you here!

It has a heavy focus on the Scriptural accounts of Jesus’ passion and death.  JPII also dropped a few stations and added some others, such as Jesus being Betrayed by Judas.  Praying the Stations of the Cross offer an important reflection of Jesus’ sacrifice for us.

O Jesus Christ, my Lord, with what great love you traveled the painful road which led to your death — and how often have I abandoned you. But now I love you with my whole soul, and because I love you, I am sincerely sorry for having offended you. My Jesus, pardon me, and permit me to accompany you on this journey. You died for love of me, and it is my wish, O my dearest Redeemer, to be willing to die for love of you. O my beloved Jesus, in your love I wish to live, and in your love I wish to die. Amen.

St. Alphonsus

JPII’s Via Crucis is interesting to those that want a mild change while they pray the Stations.  Feel free to print and redistribute our copy linked below!

Stations with St. John Paul II (Handout version)

For other prayers, visit our Prayers and Novenas page!

The Forgotten Method of Praying the Rosary that will Change Your Life

By Fr. Edward Looney

Every Lent people want to acquire a deeper prayer life. For many, this includes the desire to pray the rosary daily. Now that we are several days into Lent, how is that Lenten resolution going? Have you prayed it faithfully every day since Ash Wednesday? After you finish praying, do you feel like you really prayed it? Or did you find that you were distracted and didn’t focus on the mysteries being prayed?

What if I told you I might be able to help you pray the rosary more faithfully and want to pray it every day. What if I told you there is a way of praying the rosary to curb distractions and focus more on the mystery.

Both Bl. Pope Paul VI in his Apostolic Exhortation Marialis Cultus and St. John Paul II in Rosarium Virginis Mariae reference a custom of praying the rosary in which a person inserts a phrase after the name of Jesus in the Hail Mary prayer with reference to the mystery being contemplated.

When I learned this custom, I immediately began to practice in my life. Whenever I prayed the rosary I inserted a phrase to focus my meditation. To my amazement, it worked!

Then I read a classic work by St. Louis de Montfort called The Secret of the Rosary and at the end of the book he proposed two methods of praying the rosary, a longer and shorter form. The longer form included an intentional offering, a prayer that he had written to pray for a specific grace. The shorter form he recommended was exactly what Bl. Paul VI and St. John Paul II wrote about.

Since we are in Lent, here are the phrases he proposed for the sorrowful mysteries: thy womb Jesus in His agony; thy womb Jesus scourged; thy womb Jesus crowned with thorns; thy womb Jesus carrying His cross; thy womb Jesus crucified.

Since I found this method of praying the rosary helpful, I developed it further, beyond just the one phrase per mystery that St. Louis de Montfort recommended, extending it to each bead of the rosary. The phrases were inspired by praying with the scriptures at each site of the rosary mystery while I was in the Holy Land. The phrases for insertion are contained within A Rosary Litany which is available for purchase from arosarylitany.com.

People who have used A Rosary Litany say it has transformed how they pray the rosary one bead at a time. Inspired by our faith’s saintly tradition, they have found it to be a way of renewing the rosary devotion in their life.

Just as I renewed that pious custom of the rosary, I pray and hope that this Lent, you too might find renewal in your love for Jesus and Mary, especially as you pray the rosary!

From ChurchPop.com

10 Facts You Probably Didn’t Know about St. Patrick

Click here to read the bio on St. Patrick!

The most kids know of St. Patrick ‘s Day is that you must wear green or you’ll get a pinch from your friends. Adults see the day as an occasion to celebrate, sometimes with green beer and other assorted alcoholic beverages. However, few really know what they are celebrating or why the holiday is so important, particularly in the Americas.

The following 10 facts may help you to better enjoy this popular holiday.

10. March 17th is when Patrick died.

Saint Patrick is a saint of the Catholic Church, and his holy day is the day of his death, and subsequent entrance to heaven, rather than the day of his physical birth. After spending most of his adult life converting the pagans of Ireland to Christianity, St. Patrick went to his reward on March 17, 461 AD.

9. St. Patrick wasn’t Irish.

St. Patrick wasn’t Irish, and he wasn’t born in Ireland. Patrick’s parents were Roman citizens living in modern-day England, or more precisely in Scotland or Wales (scholars cannot agree on which). He was born in 385 AD. By that time, most Romans were Christians and the Christian religion was spreading rapidly across Europe.

8. St. Patrick was a slave.

At the age of 16, Patrick had the misfortune of being kidnapped by Irish raiders who took him away and sold him as a slave. He spent several years in Ireland herding sheep and learning about the people there. At the age of 22, he managed to escape. He made his way to a monastery in England where he spent 12 years growing closer to God.

7. St. Patrick used the shamrock to preach about the trinity.

Many claim the shamrock represents faith, hope, and love, or any number of other things but it was actually used by Patrick to teach the mystery of the Holy Trinity, and how three things, the Father, The Son, and the Holy Spirit could be separate entities, yet one in the same. Obviously, the pagan rulers of Ireland found Patrick to be convincing because they quickly converted to Christianity.

6. Legend says St. Patrick drove all the snakes from Ireland.

According to legend, St. Patrick drove all the snakes, or in some translations, “toads,” out of Ireland. In reality, this probably did not occur, as there is no evidence that snakes have ever existed in Ireland, the climate being too cool for them to thrive. Despite that, scholars suggest that the term “snakes” may be figurative and refer to pagan religious beliefs and practices rather than reptiles or amphibians.

 5. Patrick’s color is blue. 

The original color associated with St. Patrick is blue, not green as commonly believed. In several artworks depicting the saint, he is shown wearing blue vestments. King Henry VIII used the Irish harp in gold on a blue flag to represent the country. Since that time, and possibly before, blue has been a popular color to represent the country on flags, coats-of-arms, and even sports jerseys.  You can see him in blue in the Featured Picture above!

Green was associated with the country later, presumably because of the greenness of the countryside, which is so because Ireland receives plentiful rainfall. Today, the country is also referred to as the “Emerald Isle.”

4. The Shamrock is not the symbol of Ireland. 

The shamrock is a popular Irish symbol, but it is not the symbol of Ireland. As early as the medieval period, the harp has appeared on Irish gravestones and manuscripts. However, it is certain that the harp was popular in Irish legend and culture even well before that period.

Since the medieval period, the harp has represented the nation. King Henry VIII used the harp on coins as early as 1534. Later, the harp was used on Irish flags and Irish coats of arms. The harp was also used as a symbol of the Irish people during their long struggle for freedom. Starting in 1642 the harp appeared on flags during rebellions against English rule. When Ireland became an independent country in 1921, it adopted the harp as the national symbol.

3. There are more Irish in the USA than Ireland.

Well, sort of. An estimated 34 million Americans have Irish ancestry. Some are pure-blood Irish, meaning they or their parents came from Ireland, but many more have mixed ancestry today. By contrast, there are 4.2 million people living in Ireland. This peculiarity has a lot to do with the troubled history of Ireland. During the potato famine in Ireland, millions of Irish left the country for the US. This diaspora of Irish continued throughout much of the 19th century. Great numbers of Irish immigrants filled factories, served as railroad laborers –and even joined the military, sometimes immediately upon stepping foot on American soil! During the US Civil War, entire regiments of troops were comprised exclusively of Irish immigrants.  It wasn’t until the economic boom of the 1990s that more Irish stayed in their native country than traveled abroad searching for better opportunities.

2. St. Patrick’s Day in the US has a strong political history.

In the mid 19th century, the Irish faced discrimination much like that faced by African Americans. In a few rare instances, prejudice against the Irish was even more fierce! The Irish were culturally unique, Catholic, and because of deplorable conditions in Ireland, flooded into the US in large numbers. They were perceived as a potentially disloyal and were treated harshly. To combat this, the American Irish began to organize themselves politically. By the end of the 19th century, St. Patrick’s Day was a large holiday for the Irish and an occasion for them to demonstrate their collective political and social might. While the political emphasis has faded along with the discrimination, the holiday remains ever popular as an opportunity for festivity regardless of one’s cultural background.

1. St. Patrick’s was a dry holiday in Ireland until 1970.

Aside from the color green, the activity most associated with St. Patrick’s Day is drinking. However, Irish law, from 1903 to 1970, declared St. Patrick’s Day a religious observance for the entire country meaning that all pubs were shut down for the day. That meant no beer, not even the green kind, for public celebrants. The law was overturned in 1970, when St. Patrick’s was reclassified as a national holiday – allowing the taps to flow freely once again.

Bonus Fact: Your odds of finding a four-leaf clover are:

About 1 in 10,000.

St. Patrick

For the Lorica of St. Patrick, click here!

St. Patrick of Ireland is one of the world’s most popular saints. He was born in Roman Britain and when he was fourteen or so, he was captured by Irish pirates during a raiding party and taken to Ireland as a slave to herd and tend sheep. At the time, Ireland was a land of Druids and pagans but Patrick turned to God and wrote his memoir, The Confession. In The Confession, he wrote:

“The love of God and his fear grew in me more and more, as did the faith, and my soul was rosed, so that, in a single day, I have said as many as a hundred prayers and in the night, nearly the same. I prayed in the woods and on the mountain, even before dawn. I felt no hurt from the snow or ice or rain.”

Patrick’s captivity lasted until he was twenty, when he escaped after having a dream from God in which he was told to leave Ireland by going to the coast. There he found some sailors who took him back to Britain and was reunited with his family.

A few years after returning home, Patrick saw a vision he described in his memoir:

“I saw a man coming, as it were from Ireland. His name was Victoricus, and he carried many letters, and he gave me one of them. I read the heading: ‘The Voice of the Irish.’ As I began the letter, I imagined in that moment that I heard the voice of those very people who were near the wood of Foclut, which is beside the western sea-and they cried out, as with one voice: ‘We appeal to you, holy servant boy, to come and walk among us.'”

The vision prompted his studies for the priesthood. He was ordained by St. Germanus, the Bishop of Auxerre, whom he had studied under for years, and was later ordained a bishop and sent to take the Gospel to Ireland.

Patrick arrived in Slane, Ireland on March 25, 433. There are several legends about what happened next, with the most prominent claiming he met the chieftan of one of the druid tribes, who tried to kill him. After an intervention from God, Patrick was able to convert the chieftain and preach the Gospel throughout Ireland. There, he converted many people -eventually thousands – and he began building churches across the country.

He often used shamrocks to explain the Holy Trinity and entire kingdoms were eventually converted to Christianity after hearing Patrick’s message.

Patrick preached and converted all of Ireland for 40 years. He worked many miracles and wrote of his love for God in Confessions. After years of living in poverty, traveling and enduring much suffering he died March 17, 461.

He died at Saul, where he had built the first Irish church. He is believed to be buried in Down Cathedral, Downpatrick. His grave was marked in 1990 with a granite stone.

In His Footsteps:

Patrick was a humble, pious, gentle man, whose love and total devotion to and trust in God should be a shining example to each of us. So complete was his trust in God, and of the importance of his mission, he feared nothing -not even death.

“The Breastplate,” Patrick’s poem of faith and trust in God:

“Christ be within me, Christ behind me, Christ before me, Christ beside me, Christ to win me, Christ to comfort and restore me, Christ beneath me, Christ above me, Christ inquired, Christ in danger, Christ in hearts of all that love me, Christ in mouth of friend and stranger.”

From Catholic.org.

St. Dominic Savio

St. Dominic Savio was born in Italy in 1842. One day when he was just four, he disappeared and his good mother went looking for him. She found the little fellow in a corner praying with his hands joined and his head bowed. He already knew all his prayers by heart! At five, he was an altar boy. When he was seven, he received his First Holy Communion. On that solemn day, he chose a motto: “Death, but not sin!” and he kept it always.

“A teenager such as Dominic, who bravely struggled to keep his innocence from Baptism to the end of his life, is really a saint,” said Pope St. Pius X.

Yes, Dominic was an ordinary boy with an extraordinary love for God.

At the age of twelve, Dominic entered the school run by St. John Bosco. Don Bosco examined him first and at the end of the questions, Dominic asked,

“What do you think of me?”

“I think you’re good material,” answered the priest, with a big smile.

“Well, then,” said Dominic, “You are a good tailor, so if the material is good, take me and make a new suit out of me for Our Lord!”

Everyone in the school saw from the way he prayed that this boy was different. He greatly loved all the boys, and even though he was younger, he used to worry about them. He was afraid that they would lose the grace of God by sinning.

One day, a fellow brought a magazine full of bad pictures to school. In a minute, a group of boys had gathered around him to see it.

“What’s up?” wondered Dominic, and he, too, went to look. Just one peek was enough for him. He grabbed the magazine and tore it to pieces! “Poor us!” he cried in the meantime, “Did God give us eyes to look at such things as this? Aren’t you ashamed?”

“Oh, we were just looking at these pictures for the fun of it,” said one boy.

“Sure, for fun,” answered Dominic, “and in the meantime you’re preparing yourselves to go to hell!”

“Oh, what’s so wrong about looking at these pictures anyway?” another fellow demanded.

Dominic had a ready answer. “If you don’t see anything wrong,” he said sadly, “this is even worse.” It means you’re used to looking at shameful things!”

No one said anything after that. They all realized that Dominic was right. Another time he stopped a terrific stone-throwing fight between two angry boys. Holding up a little crucifix between them, he said, “Before you fight, look at this and say, ‘Jesus Christ was innocent and He died forgiving His murderers. I am a sinner, and I am going to hurt Him by not forgiving my enemies.’ Then you can start – and throw your first stone at me!”

The two boys were so ashamed of themselves that they apologized, and promised to go to confession too.

One day Dominic began to feel sick and was sent home to get better. While at home he grew worse, instead, and received the last Sacraments. He was only fifteen then, but he did not fear death. In fact, he was overjoyed at the thought of going to Heaven. Just before he died, he tried to sit up.

“Goodbye,” he murmured to his good father. Suddenly his face lit up with a smile of great joy and happiness. “I am seeing such wonderful things!” he exclaimed. Then he spoke no more, for he had gone to Heaven.

Dominic is the patron saint of choir boys and of the falsely accused.

This latter title was given to him due to the following incident. One time, two boys filled the school stove with snow and garbage during the cold winter months. When the teacher came back into the room, they falsely accused Dominic of doing the “dirty” deed. Although disciplined in front of the entire class, Dominic refused to tell on the two mischievous boys. When the truth was later revealed, Dominic was asked why he didn’t confess to his innocence. He remarked that he was imitating Our Lord, Who remained silent during His persecutions and crucifixion.

His feast day is March 9th.

From Catholic.org.

St. Francis Ch’oe Kyong-Hwan

A lay catechist, Francis Ch’oe Kyong-hwan, of Ta-rae-kol, Korea, was arrested for his faith in July of 1839 together with his wife Maria and their children. Pagan officials condemned Francis for having sought to evangelize his fellow Koreans. Immune to their threats of torture, he refused to deny his faith. Francis suffered the piercing of his flesh with spikes and a beating of over three hundred blows. So deep was his respect for the sacrament of holy orders that he adamantly resisted his captors’ attempts to make him wear the miter and chasuble of the imprisoned bishop, (Saint) Laurent Imbert. While Francis and his family were in prison, one of his sons died of starvation in his mother’s arms. Following another beating on September 11, Francis realized that he himself was dying. He told those in his prison cell that he had hoped to suffer beheading for Christ, but since God willed for him to die in prison, “his will be done.” Francis died during the night of September 11-12. His wife was beheaded in 1840. One of their sons later became Korea’s second native-born priest.

From Catholic Online.

St. Frances Xavier Cabrini

St. Frances Xavier Cabrini was born as Maria Francesca Cabrini on July 15, 1850 in Sant’ Angelo Lodigiano, Lombardy, Italy. She was born two months premature and the youngest of thirteen children. Unfortunately, only three of her siblings survived past adolescence and Frances would live most of her life in a fragile and delicate state of health.

Frances became dedicated to living a life for religious work from a young age and received a convent education at a school ran by the Daughters of the Sacred Heart. She graduated with high honors and a teaching certificate.

When Frances was 18, she applied for admission to the religious congregation of the Daughters of the Sacred Heart, but was turned down because of her poor health. Instead, a priest asked her to teach at the House of Providence Orphanage in Cadagono, Italy. She taught at the girls’ school for six years and drew a community of women in to live the religious way of life.

In 1877, she became Mother Cabrini after she finally made her vows and took the religious habit, also adding Xavier to her name in honor of St. Francis Xavier.

When the House of Providence Orphanage closed, her bishop asked her, along with six other women from her orphanage in Cadagono, to found the Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart to care for the poor children in both schools and hospitals. Frances composed the Rule and Constitution for the religious institute.

In its first five years, the institute established seven homes and a free school and nursery. Frances wanted to continue her mission in China, but Pope Leo XIII urged her to go to the United States, a nation that was becoming flooded with Italian immigrants who needed her help. “Not to the East, but the West,” was his advice to her.

On March 31, 1889, Frances arrived in New York City along with six other sisters ready to begin her new journey. However, right from the beginning she encountered many disappointments and hardships. The house originally attended for her new orphanage was no longer available, but Frances did not gve up, even though the archbishop insisted she return to Italy.

After she refused, Archbishop Michael Corrigan found them housing with the convent of the Sisters of Charity. Frances then received permission to found an orphanage in what is now West Park, New York and now known as Saint Cabrini Home.

Filled with a deep trust in god and endowed with a wonderful administrative ability, Frances founded 67 institutions, including orphanages, schools, and hospitals, within 35 years dedicated to caring for the poor, uneducated, sick, abandoned, and especially for the Italian immigrants. Her institutions were spread out in places all over the United States, including New York, Colorado, and Illinois.

Frances was known for being as resourceful as she was prayerful. She was always able to find people to donate their money, time, and support for her institutions.

In 1909, Frances became a naturalized citizen of the United States.

Eight years later, on December 22, 1917, Frances passed at the age of 67, due to complications from dysentery at the Columbus Hospital, one of her own hospitals, in Chicago, Illinois.

Frances’ body was originally placed at the Saint Cabrini Home, but was exhumed in 1931 as part of her canonization process. Her head is preserved in Rome at the chapel of the congregation’s international motherhouse. One of her arms is at the national shrine in Chicago, and the rest of her body rests at a shrine in New York.

Frances has two miracles attributed to her. She restored sight to a child who was believed to have been blinded by excess silver nitrate, and she healed a terminally ill member of her congregation.

St. Frances Xavier Cabrini was beatified on November 13, 1938, by Pope Pius XI and canonized by Pope Pius XII on July 7, 1946, making her the first United States citizen to be canonized. Her feast day is celebrated on November 13 and she is the patron saint of immigrants.

From Catholic Online.